NEW YORK/LONDON/SINGAPORE (Reuters) – In the two years since Washington lifted a 40-year ban on oil exports, tankers filled with U.S. crude have landed in more than 30 countries, ranging from massive economies like China and India to tiny Togo.
The repeal has unleashed a flood of U.S. shale oil, undercutting global crude prices, eroding the clout of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and seizing market share from many of its member countries.
In 2005, before the shale revolution, the United States had net imports of 12.5 million barrels per day (bpd) of crude and fuels – compared to just 4 million bpd today.
U.S. producers are making new customers out of some of the world’s biggest oil-importing nations in Asia and Europe, posing a serious competitive threat to the only other countries that produce as much crude: Saudi Arabia and Russia. At home, the export boom has …
READ MORE ON REUTERS.COM