That’s the worst-case scenario presented overnight by the chief of South Korea’s national weather agency — Nam Jae-cheol.
“Based on our analysis of satellite imagery, we judge that there is a hollow space, which measures about 60 to 100 meters, at the bottom of Mount Mantap in the Punggye-ri site,” he said. “So, should another nuke test occur, there is the possibility (of collapse).”
According to the Yonhap news service, troubled parliamentarians asked: “Is there a risk of radiation?”
Nam replied: “Should it sink, there is a possibility.”
SHAKEN TO THE CORE
Fears about the state of Mount Mantap in North Korea’s northeast were first raised by nuclear weapons analysts in the days and weeks following Kim Jong-un’s most recent underground test in September — by far the biggest yet.
He declared it to have been a thermonuclear device, representing a significant step forward in the power and scope of his nuclear weapons program.
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