Health workers spray insecticide to combat Zika-carrying mosquitoes under the bleachers of the Sambódrome in Rio de Janeiro in January 2016

In the spring of 2016, there was a frenzy over the threat of Zika virus at Brazil’s Olympic Games. As infections reached their peak, a group of scientists called for the games to be moved somewhere else. A number of athletes, worried about sexually transmitting the virus to pregnant partners, chose to stay home.
But a group of researchers with University of Utah and the United States Olympic Committee announced Saturday that they weren’t able to find any evidence that U.S. Olympians, Paralympians or staff got Zika virus at all.
The group took blood samples from 457 athletes and staff before and after they traveled to the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. They tested the blood for antibodies for Zika virus, along with other viruses carried by mosquitoes in the area: chikungunya, West Nile virus and dengue. Antibodies show that a person’s immune system has fought off a virus.
Out of those 457 …
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