High school students take the philosophy exam, the first test session of the 2017 baccalaureate (high school graduation exam) on June 15, 2017 at the Fustel de Coulanges high school in Strasbourg, eastern France. A total of 520.000 Students of general and technological graduating classes are registered to take their written baccalaureat exams at over 4 400 examination centres across France between June 15-June 22, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / FREDERICK FLORIN (Photo credit should read FREDERICK FLORIN/AFP/Getty Images)

Britain would have likely voted to remain in the European Union were its population educated to a slightly higher level, a new study has found.
Researchers at the University of Leicester say that had just 3 per cent more of the population gone to university, the UK would probably not be leaving the EU.
The researchers looked at reasons why people voted Leave and found that whether someone had been to university or accessed other higher education was the “predominant factor” in how they voted.
The paper, published in the peer-reviewed journal World Development, applied a multivariate regression analysis and logit model to areas of the country to identify why people voted the way they did.
The level of higher education in an area was far more important than age, gender, the number of immigrants, or income in predicting the way an area voted, the researchers found.
Age and gender were both significant but not …
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