FILE PHOTO - A demonstrator holds flags of Taiwan and the United States in support of Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen during an stop-over after her visit to Latin America in Burlingame, California, U.S., January 14, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam

U.S. State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert told reporters the administration had told Congress of the seven proposed sales on Thursday.
“It’s now valued about $1.42 billion,” she said.
The State Department said the package included technical support for early warning radar, high speed anti-radiation missiles, torpedoes and missile components.
Nauert said the sales showed U.S. “support for Taiwan’s ability to maintain a sufficient self-defense capability,” but there was no change to the United States’ long-standing “one China” policy, which recognizes Beijing and not Taipei.
The sale, which requires congressional approval, would be the first to Taiwan under Trump and the first since a $1.83 billion sale that former President Barack Obama announced in December 2015, to China’s dismay.
The previous package included two navy frigates in addition to anti-tank missiles and amphibious attack vehicles.
A State Department official said the latest package primarily represented “upgrades to existing defense capabilities aimed at converting current legacy systems …
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