Britain's opposition Labour party Leader Jeremy Corbyn applauds as he arrives at Labour Party headquarters in central London on June 9, 2017 after results in a snap general election showing a hung parliament with Labour gains and the Conservatives losing its majority. British Prime Minister Theresa May faced pressure to resign on Friday after losing her parliamentary majority, plunging the country into uncertainty as Brexit talks loom. The pound fell sharply amid fears the Conservative leader will be unable to form a government and could even be forced out of office after a troubled campaign overshadowed by two terror attacks. / AFP PHOTO / Daniel LEAL-OLIVASDANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images

Jeremy Corbyn was just 2,227 votes away from having the chance to become Prime Minister in the general election, an analysis of marginal seats has revealed.
If the Labour leader had won seven seats narrowly taken by the Conservatives, he would have had the opportunity to form a “progressive alliance” with all other smaller parties, barring the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP).
The Labour Party has said it was prepared to form a coalition government, with Mr Corbyn announcing: “We are ready to serve.”
With seven more seats going to Mr Corbyn, a coalition of Labour, the Liberal Democrats, the Scottish National Party (SNP), Plaid Cymru, the Green Party and one independent MP in the House of Commons would have held 321 seats — enough to block Theresa May and for Mr Corbyn to enter No 10. This figure excludes Kensington – expected to be another close-run contest – where counting was suspended until Friday evening.
The Green Party, SNP and Plaid Cymru had all spoken …
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