LUXOR, EGYPT - OCTOBER 23: A small ferry boat prepares to dock on the East Bank of the River Nile on October 23, 2013 in Luxor, Egypt. Luxor, one of Egypt's major tourist hot-spots, has struggled to attract visitors since a popular uprising overthrew former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in early 2011. The dip in tourist numbers is contributing directly to a rise in unemployment in the southern Egyptian city. The tourist industry has further dwindled since Egypt's first democratically elected President Mohammed Morsi was overthrown by the Egyptian Military in July, 2013. Major hotels in Luxor are reporting occupancy rates as low as 8% in recent months and many airlines have halted direct flights from cities in Europe to Luxor, further discouraging tourism to the Egyptian city famous for its archaeological sites. (Photo by Ed Giles/Getty Images)

Egypt has unearthed a more than 7,000-year-old city and cemetery dating back to its First Dynasty in the southern province of Sohag, the Antiquities Ministry said on Wednesday.
The find could be a boon for Egypt’s ailing tourism industry, which has suffered endless setbacks since an uprising that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak in 2011 but remains a vital source of foreign currency.
The city likely housed high-ranking officials and grave builders. Its discovery may yield new insights on Abydos, one of the oldest cities in Ancient Egypt, the ministry said in a statement.
Experts say Abydos was Egypt’s capital towards the end of the Predynastic Period and during the rule of the first four dynasties.
The discovery was made 400 metres away from the temple of Seti I, a New Kingdom period memorial across the Nile from present day Luxor.
Archaeologists have so far uncovered huts, pottery remains and iron tools as well as 15 …
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